Alcoholism Across The Nation: New Hampshire
Editor's Note: This is part of a new series of articles "Alcoholism Across The Nation" that features the struggles of alcohol addiction in individual states, cities, towns and communities across the United States. To contribute information, statistics, or a guest post to this series, email Kylah@AddictedToAlcohol.com with the subject line "Guest Contributor".

Statistics on Alcohol Abuse in New Hampshire

The unfortunate situation of alcohol abuse has created problems all across the continental United States. The problem differs from region to region, and New Hampshire faces more than its fair share of alcohol-related problems as well.

To really understand the scope of an issue like this, and to help make a real difference, it’s important to understand the statistics related to the problem. This helps us understand the different demographics and their relationship to alcohol, so we can develop community-based plans to help eradicate the problem of alcohol abuse.

New Hampshire Drinks Twice As Much As Other States!

The most immediately apparent, and shocking, statistic for residents of New Hampshire is the fact that New Hampshire drinks, per capita, nearly twice as much as the national average in the US.

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism performed a study focusing on the amount of booze that is bought by New Hampshire residents. Completed in 2012, the study revealed that the per capita alcohol consumption, in terms of ethanol (the pure form of alcohol) was 4.65 gallons per capita.

This is compared to the average of 2.33 gallons for the rest of the States. New Hampshire is the leading state in terms of alcohol consumption. Interestingly enough, the nearby states that comprise the rest of New England are also heavy drinkers, with 5 out of the 6 states in New England ranking in the top-20 states for alcohol consumption. Connecticut, the 6th state, ranked 26th with a consumption rate of 2.39 gallons.

Here’s an idea of New Hampshire’s position compared to other states in the Northeast:

  • Massachusetts, ranked 20th, drinks 2.57 gallons per capita
  • Vermont, ranking 8th, drinks 2.92 gallons per capita
  • Maine, ranked 17th, drinks 2.65 gallons per capita
  • Rhode Island, ranking 14th, drinks 2.72 gallons per capita

Alcohol Use Among Youth in New Hampshire

Unfortunately, no state is free from the dangers of youth alcohol consumption. New Hampshire has some interesting statistics regarding the consumption of alcohol among the younger demographic.

  • 29.9% of New Hampshire youth between the ages of 12 and 20 have admitted to consuming alcohol in the last month, which is lower than the 33% average for the rest of the United States.
  • 13.6% of New Hampshire residents between 18 and 20 reported having driven with someone who was noticeably intoxicated by alcohol.

The age at which people begin drinking in New Hampshire is also lower than the national average. Students in New Hampshire high schools were queried about when they first had a drink.

  • 10.7% reported first drinking before they turned 12
  • 18% reported first drinking between 13 and 14
  • 20.7% reported first drinking between 15 and 16
  • 4.5% reported first drinking after turning 17

The statistics of alcohol abuse in New Hampshire youth can be observed from the following statistics. High school students were asked how many days in the last month they’d had a drink.

  • 15% reported drinking on 1 or 2 days
  • 7.3% reported drinking for between 3 and 5 days
  • 3.7% reported drinking for between 6 and 9 days
  • 2.2% reported drinking between 10 and 19 days
  • 0.6% reported drinking between 20 and 29 days
  • 1.1% reported drinking every day of the month

It’s possible that the high statistics for youth drinking, and indeed higher drinking rates throughout the state, are a response of different views on alcohol when compared to the rest of the state. Students were asked whether their parents would disapprove of them having a drink every day.

  • The national average found that 90.6% of students believed their parents would strongly disapprove.
  • Only 73.6% of New Hampshire students reported that their parents would strongly disapprove.

Alcohol Abuse Among Adults In New Hampshire

Alcohol abuse statistics among adults are also generally higher than the rates found in the rest of the US. These statistics were reported by America’s Health Rankings.

  • 27.8% of New Hampshire residents between the ages of 18 and 44 reported drinking excessively, compared to 23.8% nationally.
  • 15.7% of residents between the ages of 45 and 64 reported excessive drinking, compared to 14.8% nationally.
  • 7.1% of residents reported excessive drinking, compared to 6.6% nationally.

Alcohol Abuse Among Different Income Brackets

New Hampshire residents, according to the amount of money they make, may drink more or less compared to the national average.

  • Residents who make less than $25k annually report drinking excessively 13.9% of the time, compared to 13.2% nationally.
  • Residents who make between $25k and $50k annually report drinking excessively 13.4% of the time, compared to 15.7% nationally
  • Residents who make between $50k and $75k annually report drinking excessively 16.1% of the time, compared to 18.2% nationally
  • Residents who make over $75k annually report drinking excessively 22.5% of the time, compared to 20.6% nationally

In Conclusion

While alcohol statistics in New Hampshire are generally higher than those in other states, it seems that this is because of a different attitude towards the substance from both parents and youth alike. More people may drink, but fewer people see it as dangerous.

Editor’s Note: This is part of a series of articles “Alcoholism Across The Nation” that puts a spotlight on the struggles of alcohol addiction in individual states, cities, towns and communities across the United States.  These articles show us what alcoholism really means in America today, both the big picture and on a more local, meaningful level.  To contribute information, statistics, or a guest post to this series, email our Managing Editor Kylah@AddictedToAlcohol.com with the subject line “Guest Contributor”, or just leave us a comment below.

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